Garlic Cures 100% of Warts in Clinical Study

Garlic Cures 100% of Warts In Clinical Study

By Sayer Ji

Contributing Writer for Wake Up World

In the first study of its kind, this common herb was found to have remarkable healing results for common warts and corns.

A clinical study published in the International Journal of Dermatology, titled “Healing effect of garlic extract on warts and corns,”[1] reveals the amazing healing properties of garlic extract in healing common warts and corns.

Warts are caused by the virus human papilloma virus (HPV), and corns by pressure of friction. They are some of the most common conditions found in dermatological practice today.

In the study, peeled garlic was processed to produce either a water or fat based extract. A total of twenty-eight patients with 2-96 warts, nine patients with 1-2 corns, and a control group consisting of five patients with 7-35 warts were enrolled in the study. The study design involved the following methodology:

– In the first phase of the trial, a water extract of garlic was applied twice daily on warts in five patients with 3–5 warts.

– In the second phase, 23 patients with 2–96 warts (all on the hands except for two cases who had plantar warts), and nine patients with 1–2 corns on the feet, were treated by applying a fat-soluble extract of garlic twice daily.

– A control group including two patients with warts and two with corns were treated with a 2:1 ratio of chloroform and methanol solution (the lipid solvent) for a period of 20 days to eliminate the possibility that the treatment results were affected by the solvent.

The treatment results were reported as follows:

  • Water extract of garlic: “[F]ive cases received the aqueous garlic extract for 30–40 days, which resulted only in the disappearance of small warts and partial improvement of larger warts. Treatment with the aqueous extract of garlic needed a period of more than 2 months to achieve a partial recovery in the patients.”
  • Fat-soluble extract of garlic: “Twenty-three patients with 2–96 warts, and nine patients with 1–2 corns were treated by applying the lipid extract. In this group, complete recovery was observed in all cases with warts after 1–2 weeks of treatment (Fig. a). Seven out of nine patients with corn(s) showed complete recovery (Fig. b) while two cases showed marked improvement close to full recovery with no further improvement on continuation of treatment. The period for the treatment of corn(s) in this group was between 10 and 20 days.”
  • Chloroform: methanol (control group): The control group showed no improvement.

These study results clearly reveal that the fat-soluble extract of garlic has great potential to heal these common dermatological conditions, with 100% recovery in those with warts, and 80% recovery in those with corns.

Warts

(a) Wart on finger. (b) The wart has disappeared after treatment with lipid extract of garlic

The researchers expanded on the implications of their findings by pointing out the relatively inferior results offered through conventional treatments:

Current treatment for warts in our clinics includes: electrocautery, cryotherapy or application of keratolytics. These approaches are not fully successful, and in some cases warts reappear. In our study, treatment with garlic extract resulted in no recurrence of warts during the follow-up observation period (3–4 months)… Removal of corns by surgery, which is practiced in most clinics, can be painful and costly. Treatment with garlic extract appears to be a more convenient modality.

Finally, the researchers identified the following four possible mechanisms of garlic’s anti-wart and anti-corn properties:

  • Anti-viral – HPV virus is the primary cause of the common wart. Garlic’s anti-viral properties are well established.
  • Anti-tumor – warts are actually HPV-associated growths, not unlike benign tumors. Garlic has been found to destroy a wide range of cancer cells. You can view a list of over 160 diseases garlic has been studied to have potential therapeutic value in, including over a dozen different forms of cancer.
  • Immune modulatory – The researchers noted that while the mechanism of garlic’s anti-wart and anti-corns activity is unknown, “…enhancement of immunological responses elicited by garlic may be responsible.”
  • Fibrinolytic activity – The researchers observed: “Application of garlic extract on a corn caused the removal of the corn from its place. It seems that because of the fibrinolytic effect of garlic, the surrounding fibrin tissue of the corn capsule was lyzed and the capsule was separated from the main tissue.”

Updated October 2014

References:

[1] http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-4632.2004.02348.x/abstract

Further articles by Sayer Ji:

About the author:

Sayer-Ji

Sayer Ji is an author, educator, Steering Committee Member of the Global GMO Free Coalition (GGFC), advisory board member of the National Health Federation, and the founder of GreenMedInfo.com – an open access, evidence-based resource supporting natural and integrative modalities. His writings have been published and referenced widely in print and online, including Truthout, Mercola.com, The Journal of Gluten Sensitivity, New York Times and The Well Being Journal.

In 1995 Sayer received a BA degree in Philosophy from Rutgers University, where he studied under the American philosopher Dr. Bruce W. Wilshire, with a focus on the philosophy of science. In 1996, following residency at the Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York, he embarked on a 5 year journey of service as a counsellor-teacher and wilderness therapy specialist for various organizations that serve underprivileged and/or adjudicated populations. Since 2003, Sayer has served as a patient advocate and an educator and consultant for the natural health and wellness field.

Visit GreenMedInfo online and on Facebook, or sign up for GreenMedInfo’s Newsletter.

 


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  • LB

    So if I squeeze some garlic juice out of a globe and mix it with some olive oil and apply it, will it work the same?

  • Patricia

    I am wondering…it sounds as if I put garlic oil on the warts twice a day they will go away in a matter of weeks…do they need to be covered after the garlic oil is applied? If I make my own what is the ratio of garlic to oil?
    Thank you.

  • Name (required)

    This works 100% but for an easier way to remove warts… Use Apple cider viniger – soak a cotton ball apply on wart and bandaid it. do this 2 times a day for about 4 days. And the wart can be scrapped off or just about close to it. The wart should have turned black to a certain degree prio to removing Once scraped off the area will heal in about 1 week and in about 2 months any scars will be fully removed. ** Once you initally remove wart after 3-7 days, you no longer need to use ACV.

  • Tim Wright

    Chloroform is not obtainable from suppliers here in the UK. It would be useful to hear suggestions for a substitute. Acetone perhaps?

  • Tim Wright

    On doing a little research it seems that methylene chloride with either methanol or ethanol at 5-20% should be an adequate substitute for extraction of active factors from garlic.

  • D

    Garlic and apple cider vinegar are also excellent for fungal infections of the nails and feet amongst many other things. I’m actually trying the garlic and apple cider vinegar for some seborrheic warts on my forehead ( the flattish brown ones ). I grate a little garlic on the fine side of a cheese grater and apply it to some sticky tape then apply to the wart. Be careful though as I actually burnt my forehead last night! At the moment I’m concentrating on just a single wart to see what happens.

    I used the vinegar for three consecutive days and my sister came to visit tonight and noticed a difference. I will definately come back here and let people know the outcome.

  • D

    I’d also like to add a massive THANK YOU for your site! I always appreciate sites such as this and favourite them. Sometimes I even copy the text to document ”just incase” someone ”pulls the plug” I now pass on information to my family and friends, although some think I’m nuts with the things I inform them of. I do my homework, and my eyes are open.