10 Health Benefits of Ginger

health-benefits-of-ginger-rootBy Dr. Edward F. Group

Guest Writer for Wake Up World

Earlier this year, I had a day where I experienced a sore throat and sinus irritation. I didn’t reach for a box of any over-the-counter remedy, instead I juiced a fair amount of ginger and lemon and added it to a tea. I was very satisfied with the relief I felt. My experience was nothing new; ginger, or ginger root, has been cultivated and used therapeutically for thousands of years. Traditional medicine systems all over the world have applied it to a wide range of ailments, including calming an upset stomach. Recent studies of ginger have confirmed this effect and much more…

1. Helps Calm Nausea and Vomiting

Clinical studies have proven ginger’s effectiveness at calming nausea and vomiting. [1] Research has also confirmed its potential against chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). The majority of studies found a positive effect against this side effect of aggressive therapies. [2] Ginger may be a powerful option for those suffering from toxic medical procedures like these.

2. Digestive Tract Protection

Ginger has also been historically used for flatulence, constipation, bloating, and other digestive complaints. In addition to these gastro-protective effects, researchers have found ginger to be effective for stress related ulcers. [3]

3. Brain Health

Ginger contains compounds that have demonstrated protective effects for the brain. One of them, known as 6-Shogaol, inhibited the release and expression of redness-causing chemicals known to cause damage to neurons in both in vitro and in vivo models. [4] The other, 10-gingerol, when sourced from fresh ginger, similarly impacted production of nitric oxide and other chemicals that lead to redness and swelling in the brain. [5]

4. Migraine Relief

In a clinical trial, 100 patients received ginger powder or a drug given to migraine sufferers. The results showed the ginger powder helped reduce migraine related discomfort… without side effects. [6]

5. Protection from UV Rays

Research data has shown ginger possesses UV absorbing capabilities that protect against DNA damage related to UVB (ultraviolet-B) light. Extracts from ginger stimulated antioxidant production, suggesting protective effects against potentially damaging UV light. [7]

6. Supports Stable Blood Sugar

Ginger has repeatedly demonstrated powerful blood sugar balancing effects. It acts on insulin release and sensitivity, and supports the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids.[8] In one study, insulin levels noticeably lowered with ginger supplementation. [9] In addition to its effectiveness as a blood sugar stabilizer, ginger has also demonstrated powerful protective effects against diabetic kidney, eye and liver complications.

7. Promotes Healthy Blood Pressure

Thai medical practitioners have traditionally used herbs such as ginger to support healthy blood pressure. Extracts from ginger and other herbs used in Thai therapeutic recipes were evaluated for their effectiveness against hypertension. The ginger extract was the most effective. [10]

8. May Benefit Osteoarthritis

A recent in vitro study tested ginger against drugs used for osteoarthritis — the ginger extract was demonstrated to be as effective. [11] Another study involving 43 osteoarthritis patients found ginger to be as effective and more safe than the NSAIDs. [12]

9. Helps with Muscle Aches and Discomfort

A 2013 study evaluated ginger for use in relieving muscle discomfort in female athletes. Over the course of this 6-week trial, participants taking ginger reported a significant decrease in muscle soreness as compared to the placebo. [13]

10. May Benefit Cardiovascular Function

One of the active compounds in ginger, 6-gingerol, has been isolated, tested and determined an active factor in regulating blood pressure and supporting cardiovascular health. Based on the results, researchers are exploring the potentials of ginger as a remedy for cardiovascular problems. [14]

Using Ginger

Ginger has an extremely robust flavor which makes consuming it a little bit tricky. It might be too strong to ingest on its own, but as I mentioned, it mixes incredibly well into tea or juice, it can also be a great ingredient in a recipe. What’s your favorite way to consume it? Please leave a comment below and share with us!

– Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, ND, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

Article References

  1. Palatty PL, Haniadka R, Valder B, Arora R, Baliga MS. Ginger in the prevention of nausea and vomiting: a review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(7):659-69. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2011.553751.
  2. Marx WM, Teleni L, McCarthy AL, Vitetta L, McKavanagh D, Thomson D, Isenring E. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic literature review. Nutr Rev. 2013 Apr;71(4):245-54. doi: 10.1111/nure.12016. Epub 2013 Mar 13.
  3. Haniadka R, Saldanha E, Sunita V, Palatty PL, Fayad R, Baliga MS. A review of the gastroprotective effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe). Food Funct. 2013 Jun;4(6):845-55. doi: 10.1039/c3fo30337c. Epub 2013 Apr 24.
  4. Ha SK, Moon E, Ju MS, Kim DH, Ryu JH, Oh MS, Kim SY. 6-Shogaol, a ginger product, modulates neuroinflammation: a new approach to neuroprotection.Neuropharmacology. 2012 Aug;63(2):211-23. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2012.03.016. Epub 2012 Mar 23.
  5. Ho SC, Chang KS, Lin CC. Anti-neuroinflammatory capacity of fresh ginger is attributed mainly to 10-gingerol. Food Chem. 2013 Dec 1;141(3):3183-91. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.06.010. Epub 2013 Jun 11.
  6. Mehdi M, Farhad G, Alireza ME, Mehran Y. Comparison Between the Efficacy of Ginger and Sumatriptan in the Ablative Treatment of the Common Migraine.Phytother Res. 2013 May 9. doi: 10.1002/ptr.4996.
  7. Thongrakard V, Ruangrungsi N, Ekkapongpisit M, Isidoro C, Tencomnao T.Protection from UVB Toxicity in Human Keratinocytes by Thailand Native Herbs Extracts. Photochem Photobiol. 2013 Aug 12. doi: 10.1111/php.12153.
  8. Li Y, Tran VH, Duke CC, Roufogalis BD. Preventive and Protective Properties of Zingiber officinale (Ginger) in Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Complications, and Associated Lipid and Other Metabolic Disorders: A Brief Review. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:516870. doi: 10.1155/2012/516870. Epub 2012 Nov 22.
  9. Mahluji S, Attari VE, Mobasseri M, Payahoo L, Ostadrahimi A, Golzari SE. Effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on plasma glucose level, HbA1c and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic patients. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 Sep;64(6):682-6. doi: 10.3109/09637486.2013.775223. Epub 2013 Mar 18.
  10. Manosroi A, Lohcharoenkal W, Khonsung P, Manosroi W, Manosroi J. Potent antihypertensive activity of Thai-Lanna medicinal plants and recipes from “MANOSROI III” database. Pharm Biol. 2013 Jul 22.
  11. Ribel-Madsen S, Bartels EM, Stockmarr A, Borgwardt A, Cornett C, Danneskiold-Samsà¸e B, Bliddal H. A synoviocyte model for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: response to Ibuprofen, betamethasone, and ginger extract-a cross-sectional in vitro study. Arthritis. 2012;2012:505842. doi: 10.1155/2012/505842. Epub 2012 Dec 31.
  12. Drozdov VN, Kim VA, Tkachenko EV, Varvanina GG. Influence of a specific ginger combination on gastropathy conditions in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip. J Altern Complement Med. 2012 Jun;18(6):583-8. doi: 10.1089/acm.2011.0202.
  13. Mashhadi NS, Ghiasvand R, Askari G, Feizi A, Hariri M, Darvishi L, Barani A, Taghiyar M, Shiranian A, Hajishafiee M. Influence of ginger and cinnamon intake on inflammation and muscle soreness endued by exercise in Iranian female athletes. Int J Prev Med. 2013 Apr;4(Suppl 1):S11-5.
  14. Liu Q, Liu J, Guo H, Sun S, Wang S, Zhang Y, Li S, Qiao Y. [6]-gingerol: a novel AT? antagonist for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Planta Med. 2013 Mar;79(5):322-6. doi: 10.1055/s-0032-1328262. Epub 2013 Mar 11.

Previous articles by Dr. Group:

About the author:

dr edward group iii 240x300 B 12: The Miracle VitaminDr. Edward F. Group III (DC, ND, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM) founded Global Healing Center in 1998 and is currently the Chief Executive Officer. Heading up the research and development team, Dr. Group assumes a hands-on approach in producing new and advanced degenerative disease products and information.

Dr. Group has studied natural healing methods for over 20 years and now teaches individuals and practitioners all around the world. He no longer sees patients but solely concentrates on spreading the word of health and wellness to the global community. Under his leadership, Global Healing Center, Inc. has earned recognition as one of the largest alternative, natural and organic health resources on the internet.

For more information, please visit Global Healing Center.

 


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  • TH

    My recipe is;
    1/2 tsp ginger
    1/2 tsp tumeric
    1/2 tsp cinnimon
    1/4 tsp black pepper
    1/4 cup hemp milk
    1 Tbsp raw honey
    As much fruit and veggies I want (normally 1/2 cup blue berries, 1/4 avacado, 1/2 cup spinich, 1/2 banana, and 1/2 cup pomegrante)

    Make into smoothie. Yummy and effective.

  • Carole Munn

    Increasingly frustrated at all the “health” info, but no specific info on how much! What exactly is a “fair amount”? a Teaspoon, 4 cups? please elaborate. Thanks, great article otherwise.

  • Dawn Papke (required)

    My recipe is simple;

    Slice fresh ginger,add to
    small pot of water, add whatever tea you are in the mood for.
    Add some honey and lemon.

  • Derek Went

    I grind about a pound of fresh ginger roots in a blender with hot water. The slurry is then put into very a large glass jar to which I add about 3/4 gallon of hot water and leave it to steep for a couple hours…until cool really.
    I then strain and decant the ‘juice’ into bottles to sell at a local farmer’s market as well as to use liberally at home for myself.

    It mixes well with other juices to make refreshing slushies as well as to splash into recipes, marinades, and salad dressings. The ginger root residue still has lots of flavour so I dehydrate it and add it the matted fibres to some herbal tea blends that I also put together. As it is not as strong as fresh ginger it is more palatable for adding to tea.

    I do a similar thing with whole limes…juice, skin and pith with only the seeds removed. They go great together for a really healing beverage and as a cooking ingredient.

  • Name (required)Donna Cruz

    This is a root I have been drawn to forever! It is amazing in stirfry sauces. Cut it up finely add to soy sauce or Dr. Braggs Amino Acids, finely cut garlic, a pinch of raw sugar, peanut oil, red dryed cayenne peppers (crushed to taste and your degree of hottness) and a bit of water. Mix some non-gmo cornstarch with all the ingredients. Cook your favorite stir fry ingredients and finish the dish by tossing and coating the cooked stir fry ingredients with the sauce until a bit thicken. Woolah a fantastic use of more ginger. Tasty as well

  • roslyn berryman

    I always put some fresh ginger in my morning juice,znd of course i put fresh ginger in my curries and in my salads, just LOVE it x

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